The 121514 meeting is now ONLINE!!

imagesHere’s what you missed on Monday the 15th if you didn’t get to Rotary:

  • New member inductions
  • Announcement of the 2016-2017 President Elect
  • Denise Holland from Harvest Hope Food Bank
  • A partridge in a pear tree

You don’t even have to navigate over to YouTube anymore if you miss a meeting.  They are right here on our website!  Don’t forget we will not meet again until Monday, January 5, 2015.  Medal of Honor Recipient Kyle Carpenter will speak to the club.  This is sure to be a jam packed event so get there earlier to grab a seat!

The 120814 Meeting with Dr. Lincoln is now ONLINE!!

If you missed the December 8th meeting, you missed one of the most uplifting hours of Rotary that we have had in a while.  Don’t worry, you can make up the meeting online!!  You’ll find the business portion of the meeting (including the Leadercast reveal ) and Dr. Lincoln’s talk (and the announcement of the 2015-2016 Board) below:

 

December 8th: Dr. Dick Lincoln and Board Elections

There are 3 good reasons to attend the December 8th meeting!

1.  Peyton Manning wants you to be there but you have to show up to find out why!

2. You’ll be electing the 2015-2016 Board.

3.  Dr. Dick Lincoln, Pastor of Shandon Baptist Church will be our guest speaker.  Join us for a motivating and uplifting hour of Rotary!!0e2910579_1392740806_dick-lincoln-for-web

Click here to view Dr. Lincoln’s bio.

Marshall Mays Memorial Resolution and Business Portion of 120114 Meeting

WHEREAS, Marshall Trammel Mays departed this life on March 12, 2013, at the age of 88, we, the members of the Columbia Rotary Club, desire to honor his memory with the following recognition of his life and influence among us:

Marshall Trammel Mays was born July 21, 1924, in Greenwood, South Carolina, a son of Mae Marshall Trammel and Calhoun Allen Mays. He attended Greenwood schools and enrolled in The Citadel for one year before receiving an appointment to the United States Naval Academy, from which he was graduated in 1945. During World War II he served briefly in the Pacific theatre and later in the Atlantic aboard the aircraft carrier USS Randolph.

In 1947 he entered the University of South Carolina School of Law, where he was Editor-in-Chief of the South Carolina Law Quarterly, and spent an additional year of study at Harvard Law School before joining the firm of Mays and Featherstone in Greenwood. He became active in local political and civic affairs and was elected to the General Assembly from Greenwood County in 1958.

He was recalled to active naval service during the Korean Conflict and was stationed at the Headquarters of the Sixth Fleet in Naples, Italy. He was transferred to Frankfurt, Germany, with the European Command Headquarters as a JAG officer and later to Paris. Since he had used all of his leave, he sent for Brooksie and they were married in Germany in 1953. In late 1954 he returned to Greenwood to practice law with the firm of Mays and Mays.

Marshall began to chafe under the one-party political rule extant in South Carolina at the time and began to work with like minded people from all over the state to push for a political alternative to one-party government. In 1966 the Republican Party put forth its first slate of candidates which they called the “Quality Team,” and Marshall Mays was their nominee for Lieutenant Governor. There were two U. S. Senate seats up for election that year and it was widely believed Senator Thurmond’s presence on the ticket would give it a boost. Although only Senator Thurmond was elected, the “Quality Team” fared much better than pundits expected and the modern-day Republican Party in South Carolina was here to stay.

In 1969 President Richard Nixon appointed Marshall general counsel to the Overseas Private Investment Corporation, an agency of the U. S. State Department to assist 92 developing countries friendly to the United States. He became president of this agency, and after eight years of government service, joined the Washington law firm of Hogan and Hartson and later went into private business.

Marshall was a passionate intellectual who could identify trends on a global basis. One of the most important in his opinion was world population growth, and using worldwide contacts established decades earlier, travelled to India and spoke to a number of Rotary Clubs about the dire need to control the world’s population explosion, all at his own expense and on his own time.

Marshall was a member of Trinity Cathedral in Columbia and had been a member of the vestry of Episcopal Churches in Greenwood, SC, and Alexandria, VA; the Rotary Clubs of Greenwood, Washington, DC, and Columbia; the Potomac Society; the Metropolitan Club; the Army-Navy Country Club, the Palmetto Club; the Cotillion Club of Columbia; the Columbia Sailing Club; and he was a guardian of the University of South Carolina. Governor James B. Edwards bestowed on him The Order of the Palmetto.

He retired with his family to Columbia where he continued to be engaged in charitable and civic activities. He joined the Columbia Rotary Club in 2001 with 28 years of previous service and was a multiple Paul Harris Fellow. He kept up his Rotary attendance until the last few years when he and Brooksie moved to Still Hopes as he began experiencing declining health and was not been able to be with us on a regular basis.

He was survived by his wife, the former Jane Brooks Marshall of Columbia, to whom he was married for almost 60 years; three sons: Marshall Trammell Mays, Jr., of Hong Kong and an active Rotarian; Patrick Calhoun Mays of Davidson, NC; and the Rev. Foster Marshall Mays of Sedan, Kansas; his brother, Calhoun A. Mays, Jr., of Greenwood; and five grandchildren.

The strong intellect, pioneer spirit and dedicated service of this remarkable man who was our friend have enhanced the lives of everyone who knew him and we are grateful to his family for sharing him with us.

NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED:

  1. That we, the members of the Columbia Rotary Club, do hereby pay honor this day to the memory of our fellow Rotarian and friend, Marshall Trammell Mays, whose life made this city, state and nation a better place through his service in the highest ideals of Rotary and of his profession; and
  1. That we again express to his family and friends our deepest sympathy in their loss; and
  1. That copies of this resolution be sent to his widow and children with the original being filed as a permanent part of our club records.

ADOPTED DECEMBER 1, 2014 BY COLUMBIA ROTARY CLUB.

Memorial Resolution of Joseph Kenyon East

IMG_439331944WHEREAS, Joseph Kenyon East, an innovative public educator, university co-founder and successful entrepreneur and businessman, departed this life on February 15, 2011, the day before his 98th birthday, we, the members of the Columbia Rotary Club, desire to honor his memory with the following recognition of his life and influence among us:

Joseph Kenyon East was born February 16, 1913, near Lineville, Alabama, the son of the late Z. R. and Eva East and the oldest of their ten children. He was graduated from Berry College in Rome, Georgia, earned a Masters degree from Wofford College and did additional graduate study at Duke University and Columbia University in New York.

Ken moved to Horry County, South Carolina, in 1936 and began a 48 year career in public education as teacher and later principal of Horry Elementary School, then as principal of Aynor High School. In 1942 he became Superintendent of Schools in Cottageville and during his time there became involved with local farmers providing refrigerated transportation for their produce, which enabled them to access more distant markets, especially in the northeast, and vastly increase their incomes. This was certainly among the first such services in the southeast and perhaps the nation.

In 1946 he moved to Blacksburg, and it was while serving as superintendent there that he created in 1950 the first tax-supported kindergarten in South Carolina, twenty years before the South Carolina General Assembly enacted legislation creating a statewide kindergarten system. He was a member of the Blacksburg Rotary Club during his years there and was elected its president.

In 1953 he returned to Horry County as Director of Instruction for Horry County Schools where he established the first countywide audio-visual library for public schools in the state, and was also instrumental in improving adult literacy in the county. While there he began working with key individuals in the community who envisioned the establishment of a junior college to enable local students to earn college credits without having to leave town. It was Ken East who persuaded the College of Charleston to sponsor an extension program in Conway, which was a completely novel concept in South Carolina, and to help make it a reality, he served as the first secretary of the Coastal Educational Foundation, and worked to create the curriculum and recruit the faculty. Our state’s first tax supported junior college, Coastal Carolina Junior College, opened its doors in September, 1954, with 53 students. Today Coastal Carolina University serves 10,000 students and has 1,100 employees.

Ken moved to Columbia in 1959 to establish and supervise the first audio-visual education program for the State Department of Education, where he established a statewide library of free films for public schools. During this period he was intimately involved in the planning and development of South Carolina’s Educational Television system.

He was appointed Director of Adult Education for South Carolina in 1965 when less than 6,000 people were enrolled in the program. During his 18 years of leadership more than 850,000 students enrolled in adult education classes, South Carolina had one of the highest rated programs in the nation and his model was adopted by many other states. He was elected Chairman of the National Council of State Directors of Adult Education in 1974 and is recognized in the South Carolina Adult Education Hall of Fame as the “Father of Adult Education in South Carolina.”

Upon his retirement from the State Department of Education in 1983 he was appointed by the U. S. Department of Education to serve as a consultant for the southeastern states and testified before legislative committees in South Carolina and Congressional committees in support of adult education.

The awards he received were numerous: the Outstanding Service Award from the National Association of Public, Continuing and Adult Education; an honorary Doctor of Education degree from the University of South Carolina; the Jefferson Award from the American Institute for Public Service; the Order of the Palmetto from Gov. Richard W. Riley; and the Distinguished Achievement Award from Berry College, his alma mater.

Ken was a Rotarian for 61 years and joined the Columbia Rotary Club in August, 1964, with the classification “Education-Adult,” and he was a Paul Harris sustaining member, six time Paul Harris Fellow and a President’s Club donor to the Columbia Scholars Fund.

A deeply spiritual man, his sterling character had been formed by his experiences growing up in rural Alabama and his love of agriculture never waned. He was an experienced organic gardener long before it gained currency and had a special passion for propagating heirloom roses. Beginning at age 14, he was a Sunday School teacher for 68 years and a life deacon in the First Baptist Church of Columbia. He possessed a strong faith that produced a bold but humble confidence which endeared him to others and enabled him to be the useful man he was in his work and in his community.

He was survived by his wife of 71 years, Leona Strickland East, who has since died; four sons, Ken East, Jr., a member of our Rotary Club, Louis East, a charter member of the St. Andrew’s Rotary Club, and Bill East, all of Columbia, and Larry East of Aiken; 13 grandchildren, 25 great-grandchildren, and a great-great grandchild, two sisters and three brothers.

The dedicated service and generous philanthropy of this remarkable man who was our friend have enhanced the lives of everyone who knew him and we are grateful to his family for sharing him with us.

NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED:

1. That we, the members of the Columbia Rotary Club, do hereby pay honor this day to the memory of our fellow Rotarian and friend, Joseph Kenyon East, whose life made this city, state and nation a better place through his service in the highest ideals of Rotary and of his profession; and

2. That we again express to his family and friends our deepest sympathy in their loss; and

  1. That copies of this Resolution be sent to his children with the original being filed as a permanent part of our club records.

ADOPTED ON NOVEMBER 10, 2014 BY COLUMBIA ROTARY CLUB

Monday, December 1st: Major General H. D. Polumbo, Jr., Shaw AFB

Hope everyone had a wonderful Thanksgiving!  We will be back to our usual 1PM start time on Monday, December 1st.

130531-F-JZ002-440Major General H.D. Polumbo, Jr., Commander, Ninth Air Force, Air Combat Command, Shaw Air Force Base will speak to the club on Monday.  Please click here for a full bio of Major General Polumbo.

We only have 3 meetings left in 2014.  If you miss a meeting, you can always make up the meeting online via the Columbia Rotary You Tube Channel.  Click on the MEMBERSHIP tab in the top right of the home page or click here.

Go Rotary!

Monday, Nov. 17th: Steve Lonegan; American Principles in Action

Monday is the LAST meeting in November and it will begin at 12:30 PM.

steve-profile-1Please plan to join us at Rotary on November 17th.  It’s a busy time of year with so much happening and it’s important to attend the meetings so you don’t miss out!  On Monday, Columbia Rotary will host Steve Lonegan, Director of Monetary Policy for the American Principles in Action.  As the head of the Fix the Dollar project, Steve is charged with the responsibility of building national grassroots support for sound monetary policy and restoring the Gold Standard.

Visit FixTheDollar.com for Steve’s bio and more information on the Fix The Dollar project and the American Principles in Action.

Hope everyone has a great weekend!  See you on Monday at Rotary!